Is Video the new DTP?

 

You know you’re getting older when you can spot business trends repeating!

The world itself is changing really fast and leaving the past far behind, but humans are still humans and certain responses and behaviours just don’t change.

Take DTP (desktop publishing). When it was the latest thing, I was a journalist for creative publications – and let me tell you, creatives weren’t at all happy. The top art directors in London’s west end were very worried about standards, about quality, about creativity, and above all about protecting brands. Why? Because new software meant that almost anyone could create ‘artwork’ and print a ‘brochure’.

And they did.

I’m sorry to say that the quality of output plummeted, and many believed that the role of the graphic designer was under threat because people could now ‘do it themselves’.

Did that happen? Is high quality graphic design a thing of the past, with everyone ‘doing it themselves’? No, of course not. The world just slightly readjusted, and then carried on. An awareness developed that certain materials were well suited to being produced by generalists using ‘DTP’ whilst others needed the extra edge and design sensitivity that could only be achieved by specialists.

So the relevance of all this is, that it’s happening again. This time with video. People’s appetite for video on the internet seems insatiable.

  • Over half a billion people are watching video on Facebook every day (Forbes)
  • Every second, a million minutes, or almost 17,000 hours of video content will cross the network by 2021, according to Cisco. (Forbes)
  • Using the word ‘video’ in an email subject line boosts the open rates by 19% (Syndacast)
  • 48% of marketers plan to add YouTube to their content strategy in the next year (HubSpot)
  • There’s some great software available that allows you to create your own videos. Let’s face it, you can film on your smartphone right now and upload it to the internet. But, what does the result say about your brand? What outcome do you want to create and is the video suited to its context?

Apply the same high standards to video as you do across all other areas of corporate identity. People will assume that the quality parameters you apply to your video will be the same as those you apply to your products and services. ‘Point and click’ is more than risky – consider:

  • Is the lens clean?
  • Do you need a tripod to avoid ‘shake’?
  • Landscape or portrait?
  • How can you improve sound quality?
  • Is there anything you wouldn’t want people to see in the background?
  • Does the look, feel and tone reinforce your brands?
  • Are the values the video conveys aligned with your strategy?

As with ‘DTP’, there’ll be a place in your marketing mix for self-produced video, and a place for professionally produced. Our advice to you is recognise which is which, and consider some basic Video Training to set you on the right path for creating quality productions that deliver the right results.

by Pam Ashby

More from the Blog

Action Over Contemplation

Action Over Contemplation

All Publicity is Good Publicity

All Publicity is Good Publicity

Are Buyers now in Control?

Are Buyers now in Control?

Embracing Feedback in Marketing

Embracing Feedback in Marketing