All Publicity is Good Publicity

All Publicity is Good Publicity

 

It’s tempting to jump when someone offers you a chance to publicise your organisation, your new product, or your service. It may be a good price – but have you assessed the risks? How many times have we heard that? Dangerous words.

It’s just too easy to jump when someone offers you a chance to publicise your organisation, your new product, or your service. It may be a good price – but what if it doesn’t do what you want?

Or even damages your brand by associating it with the wrong audience?

‘All Publicity is Good Publicity’? No, not really.

The suggestion prompts some useful and key questions though, that should be core to all marketing thinking:

  1. What is your strategy?
    If your organisation’s strategy is built around ‘white labelling’ for a stronger brand, or if you are working in military defence, then ‘publicity’ may simply take a back seat.
  2. Who are you targeting?
    An excellent advert or article placed in a high quality publication may still demonstrate a waste of resources if it’s read by people who are not your priority audience, and have limited interest in what you’re offering.
    The same people may be a priority for building interest at another time, but you’ll get more value by prioritising your audiences and hitting the same groups in different ways through multiple channels – small drips will eventually fill the pot.
    It’s a fundamental principle of Agile Marketing – identify where the biggest value lies for the organisation in the shortest term, and make things happen to realise that value!
    Focus limited resources and budget where real value can be captured.
  3. What outcome do you want?
    Assuming you get your publicity in front of the ‘right’ people, what would you like them to think, feel or do?
    If this publicity isn’t fulfilling your strategy in some way, then the likelihood is that you may be wasting effort and money and you simply shouldn’t be doing it.
    Consider whether you’re looking to build your database of contacts, looking for people to buy a product or service, ask you for advice, visit your website, join your LinkedIn group? There are many options, and it’s easy to miss these basic parameters. You won’t create a successful piece of content, whatever form that takes, if you’re not outcome focused.
  4. What might get in the way of success?
    This could be quite a big question, but in Agile there’s the notion of ‘Minimal Viable Product’ (MVP) which encourages us to avoid ‘gold plating’ that may not be needed or valued by the intended audience. Why write 3000 words if 500 will be easier to digest and achieve the outcome you want? Or does your audience need to see that you appreciate and understand the fine detail of the subject matter that’s critical for their business?
    Should you take an iterative approach, and create something smaller, faster, so it can start building engagement straightaway? Working iteratively allows an organisation to start benefiting even while a more ambitious publicity plan is being put together. Being timely and responding to market interest can be critical. Don’t overcomplicate things – strip it back to the MVP and get it out there while it’s relevant.
  5. Who are the right people to involve?
    Where are the people with the best skill sets to create or evaluate this publicity? The people that will ensure it delivers value to your target audience. By collaborating with experts inside and outside your organisation you will ensure the best quality output.
    The next time someone offers you a chance for publicity, consider these questions.
    Consider what is best suited to your prioritised audience. One size sadly does not fit all.
    In Agile, we have the concept of ‘just enough’. Make sure you give each opportunity enough up-front thinking to confirm it will help deliver your strategy, and not just keep you busy and use up your budget.
    This is what will generate results.

by Pam Ashby

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